Want the latest analysis of U.S. politics? In China, I’m your guy.

rick on cctv

Appearance #2.

I didn’t come to China to be a talking head.

I was thrilled to join the faculty of Tsinghua University this September to teach multimedia journalism and co-direct the Global Business Journalism program. The TV gig has been an unexpected pleasure.

Four times during my first month in Beijing, I’ve been called upon to analyze American economic, diplomatic and political issues for China Central Television’s English-language news show “Dialogue.” The show is blessed with one of the smartest hosts in global TV, Tian Wei, and allows guests to engage in an in-depth dialogue on important international issues.

No yelling. No screaming. Instead, viewers watch a briskly paced discussion with smart questions.

In case you missed my appearances, here are links to the four shows. (I tried to embed the videos from the CCTV web site but WordPress is acting finnicky.

The first show is a discussion of the emerging U.S.-China “major power relationship” in diplomacy. The second is a review of the United Nations resolution on Syria. The third focuses on the Asia Pacific economic summit (APEC) skipped by President Obama because of the government shutdown in DC. And the fourth was — guess what? — about the government shutdown itself and its impact on America, America’s place in the world, and the U.S. and global economies.

You may have better things to do than watching me talk for four hours. But in case you want to take a look … enjoy!


DIRECT LINK: http://english.cntv.cn/program/dialogue/20130925/100634.shtml


DIRECT LINK: http://english.cntv.cn/program/dialogue/20130929/100452.shtml


DIRECT LINK: http://english.cntv.cn/program/dialogue/20131008/100695.shtml


DIRECT LINK: http://english.cntv.cn/program/dialogue/20131011/100593.shtml

Ten ways appearing on TV in China is different than the United States

The logo of CCTV English's current affairs program

The logo of CCTV English’s current affairs program

I’ve just completed my debut on Chinese TV before what was probably the biggest audience in my 35-year journalism career.

I was a guest on the nightly news show called “Dialogue” on CCTV (China Central TV). It’s a half-hour program where policy experts sit down and debate — freely, in my case — important international issues. No yelling. No screaming.

That alone is a big change from my appearances on — and viewing of — American TV news.

Here are some other differences between being a guest on Chinese TV and American TV:

1. No limo to pick you up.

2. No make-up artist.

3. No green room.

4. All of the anchors know what they’re talking about.

5. All of the anchors speak perfect English.

6. In-depth discussion of international issues.

7. Thirty minutes. No commercial interruptions.

8. No interruptions at all — the host and other panelist let me finish each answer before responding themselves.

9. No limo to drive you home.

10. I rode my bike home from the East Gate of Peking University subway stop after finishing the show.